Document Actions

MSE Seminars old

 

Aug. 29, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - "Origami Material Design: Crossroads of Art and Engineering"

Speaker: Phil Buskohl, Air Force Research labs (AFRL) Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414
Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

The functionality of an engineering design is intrinsic to its geometry form or shape. By extension, engineering structures that change shape may possess multiple functions and have the additional benefit of tunable geometry for a specific task. The ancient art form of paper folding, known as origami, offers insight for the design of shape changing structures. Origami structures by definition can “shape-shift” between multiple geometric configurations that are predefined by a pattern of folds, which reduces an arbitrary 3D transformation into a series of coordinated rotations. Furthermore, origami structures can be fabricated and transported in the flat state, offering a clear advantage for streamlined manufacturing and efficient use of material. However, transferring origami principles to engineering design raises complex questions that are inherently multidisciplinary: What is a fold? How do different materials fail in folding? What is the optimal fold pattern for a target folded shape? What is the optimal fold stiffness distribution? How can we remotely actuate an origami structure with stimuli responsive materials? Materials science, mechanics, design engineering, and computer science all interest in the solution to these questions. Our approach at AFRL is to build a design and analysis toolset by combining a mechanical model of the origami structure with topology optimization. With this toolset we have designed an origami actuator, analyzed the effects of fold stiffness on a snap-thru structure, and optimized the director pattern a liquid crystal elastomer network. The failure behaviors of several polymers under folding have also been experimentally investigated with a custom mechanical creasing test, which will directly feed into further refinements of the mechanical model. Together, these tools bring the ascetically pleasing design concepts of origami art closer to full use as a engineering design platform for shape changing structures.

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu

Speaker Bio
Phil Buskohl, Ph.D.

Phil Buskohl is a Post-doctoral research scientist with the Air Force Research labs (AFRL) at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, OH. His current research includes the translation of origami design principles to engineering applications, the dynamics of self-oscillating gels, and mechanical modeling of stimuli responsive materials. He received his PhD from Cornell University in the field of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics where he studied the mechanical regulation of embryonic heart development.

Sept. 5, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - "RNA Nanotechnology and siRNA/drug delivery"

Speaker: Peixuan Guo, University of Kentucky
Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414
Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

The research in my lab includes both basic research and practical, or commercial, applications. We try to answer basic questions on the mechanisms of viral assembly and DNA packaging with phi29 nanomotor. The approaches include molecular biology, chemistry, biophysics, computer modeling, and mathematical quantification to investigate fundamental questions such as RNA/protein or RNA/DNA interactions, macromolecular structure and function, nanomotor performance, and energy transformation. We have constructed a functional nanomotor with purified components. We have been able to convert the DNA- filled complexes into infectious virions in the test tube with the exclusive use of proteins from purified or synthetic components. With such a functional synthetic system, we are able to further the study of the mechanisms of the phi29 DNA packaging motor in depth. We then apply the knowledge derived from basic studies to solve practical problems, such as design of nanodevices, applications in nanotechnology, drug/gene/siRNA delivery and therapy of cancer, viral infection and genetic diseases, development of molecular vaccines, diagnosis of diseases, detection of pathogens and single molecule sensing of the environment, single DNA sensing, and design of chips or arrays for computer storage.

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu

Speaker Bio Peixuan Guo, UK

Dr. Peixuan Guo received his training in both human and animal medicine as well as microbiology in his early career. He was a technician in Minnesota Immunology Center from 1983 to 1984. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1987 majoring in Microbiology with a minor degree in Genetics and a research program in Biophysics/Virology; was a post-doc at NIH Laboratory of Viral Diseases led by Bernard Moss, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the leader in vaccinia virus research. He joinedPurdue University as an assistant professor of Molecular Virology in 1990, was tenured in 1993, became a full Professor in 1997, and was honored as a Purdue Faculty Scholar in 1998. He was the founder and director of Purdue Interdisciplinary Graduate Program of Virus Research and Purdue Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs of Nanobiotechnology. He served as the Director of theNIH Nanomedicine Development Centerfrom 2006-2011. He was recruited to the University of Cincinnati as Dane and Mary Louise Miller Endowed Chair of Biomedical Engineering in 2007, and moved toUniversity of Kentucky as William Farish Endowed Chair in Nanobiotechnology in 2012, and currently is the UK Director of Nanobiotechnology Center, and Director of NCI Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Program in RNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy.

Sept. 12, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - " Carbon Nanotube Based Artificial Hair Sensor for Omni-directional Detection of Low Speed Airflow"

Sensory hairs are common throughout the natural world, serving diverse functions in varied environments. Hairs located on the wings of bats are thought to detect the flow pattern of air during flight for enhanced navigation and aerobatic-like flight control. This rapid detection of small-scale airflow variations via the hair shaft deflection of a single sensor or as part of distributed arrays contributes to natural fliers having greater flight agility than current engineered systems and is the inspiration for the development of bioinspired flow sensing systems. Biologically-inspired artificial hair sensors (AHS) attempt to mimic the awareness and rapid response to external fluid flows of natural flyers. This seminar will introduce a highly- sensitive “hair plug” style AHS device for the omni-directional detection of low-speed airflow. An assembled device consists of a single CNT-coated microfiber (7-25 μm diameter) embedded in a glass microcapillary, avoiding MEMs fabrication techniques. The AHS response to the free stream velocity change was a change in resistance, closely resembling the ramps and constant velocity holds of the free stream cycling over nominal velocities ranging from <1 to 10 ms-1. Over this velocity range, we find a proportional and repeatable relationship between flow velocity at the hair tip and resistance output with a sensitivity of 1.3-1.8% resistance change per 1 m.s-1 change in air speed. This large response is between 5 – 100 times more sensitive than AHS devices previously reported.

Speaker: Gregory J. Ehlert, Air Force Research Laboratory Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414
Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu

Speaker Bio
Gregory J. Ehlert, Air Force Research Laboratory
Dr. Gregory J. Ehlert is currently a materials research engineer in the Composites Branch of the Materials
and Manufacturing Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory. He earned his Ph.D. from University
of Florida (2012), M.S.E from Arizona State University (2009), and B.S. from Michigan Technological University (2007), all in Mechanical Engineering. Dr. Ehlert’s research interests include organic matrix
composite materials, multifunctional composites, and hierarchical fibers.
 

Sept. 19, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - " Carbon Nanotube Based Artificial Hair Sensor for Omni-directional Detection of Low Speed Airflow"
Speaker: Michael Cassir, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP)
Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414

Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

High-temperature fuel cells are strategic devices for co-generation due to their efficiencies and flexibility, but they are still facing difficulties of full commercialization, due to poor yields, durability and costs. The main issues are related to the selection of adapted materials in order to ensure chemical and mechanical stability, accelerated kinetics and degradation protection. After a rapid view on the state-of the art materials in molten carbonate fuel cells, MCFC, and solid oxide fuel cells, SOFC, we will focus on the role of thin functional layers, which are becoming a key point for improving interface reactions. The role of micro- or nano-strutured thin films can be diverse: protective layers for MCFC (carbonate corrosion) and SOFC (diffusion or electronic barriers), bond layers between electrodes and interconnects and catalytic layers. Moreover for SOFCs, thin-layered electrolytes can be envisaged for micro fuel cells systems as well as active electrolyte or electrode layers to improve both charge and mass transport. In paralel, high- temperature water electrolysis cells operating as a reverse SOFC are becoming an important issue for the efficient production of hydrogen. Some examples will be introduced outlining the key aspects for improving their performance and understanding degradation and ageing issues. Finally, we will mention briefly new concepts/materials related to high-temperature devices, such as Direct Carbon Fuel Cells, composite electrolyte oxide/carbonates combining MCFC/SOFC technologies and CO2 valorisation

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu

Speaker Bio
Michael Cassir, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP)
Professor Cassir is the Head of the Electrochemistry of Extreme Media Research Team. Between 2009 and
2013 he was the Head of the Electrochemistry, Chemistry of Interfaces and Modeling for energy
Laboratories. He was the Head of Department of Analytical Chemistry in Mexico (UNAM) and Co-
Director of The Electrochemistry and Analytical Chemistry Center. He is a Member of the National
Committee for the National Center for Scientific Research. He has published about 200 scientific papers,
125 in peer-reviewed journals; 7 Book Chapters; 2 Patents. His areas of expertise include Analytical
Chemistry, Electrochemistry, Functional thin Layers, Fuel Cells, Batteries, and Catalysis.
 
Sept. 26, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - "Stimuli-Responsive Liquid Crystalline Materials Towards Optics and Origami"

Speaker: Timothy J. White, Air Force Research Laboratory
Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414

Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

Liquid crystalline materials are ubiquitous stimuli-responsive materials that are the basis of the $2B display industry. In this seminar, I will detail recent efforts focused on extending the distinctive properties of these materials to applications ranging from optics to morphing structural elements derived from origami tesselations. The seminar will begin by detailing recent efforts in which exceptionally large range reflection notch tuning (up to 1200 nm) and dynamic bandwidth control in polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystals have been observed. The talk will end by discussing the synthesis and characterization of both glassy and elastomeric liquid crystalline polymer networks to yield monolithic, shape-changing structures triggered with both heat and light.

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu

Speaker Bio
Timothy J. White, Air Force Research Laboratory
Timothy J. White received a B.A. in Chemistry in 2002 from Central College and a Ph.D. in Chemical and
Biochemical Engineering in 2006 from the University of Iowa. He currently is a senior research engineer
and leader of the “Responsive Photonic Materials” (RPM) group at the Air Force Research Laboratory in
the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate. Dr. White was recently honored with the 2012 Air Force
Early Career Award, the 2013 American Chemical Society PMSE Division Award for “Cooperative
Research in Applied Polymer Science”, and the 2013 SPIE Early Career Achievement award. His research
currently focuses on range of topics relating to polymers, liquid crystals, and polymer/liquid crystal
composites with specific emphasis on the development of autonomous optical and mechanical systems.
 
Oct. 3, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - " Emerging Revolutionary Role of Photovoltaics in Energy Sector "

With the advent of low-cost solar panels and our ability to generate, store and use electrical energy locally without the need for long-range transmission, the world is about to witness transformational changes in electricity infrastructure. The six D’s driver of photovoltaics (PV) revolution are: digitized, deceptive, disruptive dematerialized, demonetized, and democratized (http://www.forbes.com/sites/peterdiamandis/2014/09/02/solar-energy-revolution-a-massive-opportunit). The use of PV as source of direct current (DC) power reduces the cost and improves the reliability of PV system. DC microgrid and DC nanogrid based on PV and battery storage can provide sustainable electric power to all human beings in equitable fashion. The electricity industry in developed economies is on the cusp of a dramatic transformation driven by a series of changes that includes emergence of rooftop solar and battery storage as the dominant distributed generation source, real time grid monitoring, emergence of microgrid and nanogrid in place of integrated electric grid, improved energy efficiency, advantages of direct current in place of alternating current, cyber and grid security, climate control and weather tolerant electric infrastructures. The continuous decrease in the cost of photovoltaics (PV) generated electricity is now making it possible to eradicate global energy poverty. The key objective of this seminar is to highlight the specific research areas in materials, processing and manufacturing of photovoltaic devices and systems that have further transformational capabilities.

Speaker: Rajendra Singh, Clemson University,
Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414
Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu
Speaker Bio
Rajendra Singh, Clemson University,
With proven success in operations, project/program leadership, R&D, product/process commercialization,
and start-ups, Dr. Singh is a leading photovoltaics (PV) and semiconductor expert with over 35 years of
industrial and academic experience of photovoltaic and semiconductor industries. From solar cells to
integrated circuits, he has led the work on semiconductor and photovoltaic device materials and processing
by manufacturable innovation and defining critical path. His current key focus is to eradicate global energy
poverty by using photovoltaics electricity. He has received a number of international wards. Photovoltaics
World (October 2010) selected him as one of the 10 Global “Champions of Photovoltaic Technology”. Dr.
Singh is 2014 recipient of the SPIE Technology Achievement Award. On April 17, 2014 White House
honored him as “Champion of Change” for Solar Deployment. He is a Fellow of IEEE, SPIE, AAAS and
ASM.

Oct. 17, 2014 2:30 p.m. - 3:25 p.m. - " This is General Electric Aviation"

GE is an advanced technology, services and finance company taking on the world's toughest challenges. Dedicated to innovation in energy, health, transportation and infrastructure, GE operates in more than 100 countries and employs about 300,000 people worldwide. GE Aviation is a world-leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft, and ship propulsion applications. GE’s customers are builders and operators of military and civil aircraft, including large transports, fighters, UAVs, helicopters and regional and business jets. At GE Aviation, we are imagination at work; whether we’re manufacturing components for our GEnx engines or driving innovation in fuel and noise reduction.

GE Aviation has a global service network to support many product offerings with the best people and the best technologies. GE Aviation teams are dedicated to turning imaginative ideas into advances in aviation that solve some of the world’s toughest problems. GE Aviation is a dynamic environment where our ongoing, substantial investment in research and development keeps us moving forward. At GE, developing people is embedded in our culture and integral to our growth with collaborative teams of the highest caliber talent, utilizing cutting-edge technology and processes. GE is a diverse work environment that makes innovations a reality.

Dr. Schulte has over eighteen years of experience managing technical investigations of polymeric and composite materials for government, automotive, aerospace, and medical applications. He has twenty-five technical publications, fifteen U. S. and International patents, and is often an invited lecturer on composite aerospace materials. He joined the Advanced Composites Technology group at General Electric Aviation in 2005 where his roles included Development and Materials Applications Engineer (MAE) and Process Certifying Agent (CA). His Leadership experience includes Manager of the Repair MAE Group and Airfoils Laboratories, Composite Technician Team Leader and PMC Technology Development Leader for the Materials and Process Engineering Department (MPED). Prior professional experience includes a six year tenure with the Advanced Materials Applications (AMA) group at Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio.

Dr. Schulte has extensive materials development and processing experience in commercial and government programs. This includes: FAA substantiation of ballistic containment materials, synthesis and characterization of ionically-conductive polymers for fuel cells, high refractive index materials, photonic materials integration, aircraft engine fire root-cause investigations, and biodegradable plastics development. Investigations of materials for military semi-permeable battery separator membranes resulted in several novel materials compositions. His technical experience also includes failure analysis of adhesives in optical components for medical applications, development of anti-reflective and environmentally stable coatings, ultrasonically- assisted injection molding, non-invasive detection of bulk defects in polymeric materials using ultrasonics, and medical device and product development. He is the recipient of a multitude of MPED achievement awards for contributions to composite materials development, processing, and manufacturing.

Speaker: Michael, Schulte, General Electric Aviation Location: Zimmer Hall, Room 414
Sponsored By: Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati

Contact for Event

Jude Iroh
Phone: 513556 3115 Email: jude.iroh@uc.edu

Speaker Bio
Michael, Schulte, General Electric Aviation